Nielsen's Psyc of Religion: Frequently Asked Questions
Back to Psychology of Religion Home Page

Frequently Asked Questions

Over the years I've answered thousands of emails from people with questions who have visited this site. Here are some of the more commonly asked questions, along with my typical response.

How do I cite your page in my research paper using APA Style?

I am a high school student and would like to study psychology of religion while attending college. Where should I go?

 

I am a college student and would like to study psychology of religion in graduate school. What's next?

What is it like to be a professor?

I would like to get a doctorate in clinical or counseling psychology, and to do so with a professor who studies religion. What schools offer this?

I'm doing a study of religion and would like to find a scale to measure it. What scale should I use?

Is my degree -- Ph.D. in psychology of religion, in a department of religion -- going to land me a job in a psychology department?

I don't see my question listed here. What is your email address?

 

Search PsyRel for other topics


I would like to cite your page in my research paper. How do I do that in APA Style?

    APA format for citing web pages changes from time to time. To cite my main page, for example, you would use the following:
    Nielsen, M. E. (2006). Psychology of religion pages. Retrieved February 2, 2006, from http://www.psywww.com/psyrelig/
    Return to top

I am a high school student and would like to study psychology of religion while attending college. Where should I go?

    Good for you! Psychology of religion is a fascinating subject and a fine part of a college education. It is not taught on all campuses, so finding a college that includes it as part of its curriculum can be difficult. You have two basic options. One is to examine the catalog of the colleges you are considering, and look to see if psychology of religion is listed in the catalog. Normally courses are listed by department, so be aware that the course may be listed in the psychology department or in the religion department. The second option is to look at my Research and Teaching Exchange for a faculty members who teach the course. Doing this may not only help you find someone who is actively involved in the psychology of religion, but also colleges that you might not have considered. Return to top

I am a college student and would like to study psychology of religion in graduate school. What's next?

I would like to get a doctorate in clinical or counseling psychology, and to do so with a professor who studies religion. What schools offer this?

    Getting into an applied psychology program is not easy, as most admit only a small percentage of their applicants. Adding a religious component to your search then limits the number of schools even further. This means that your task is not impossible, but it will require a combination of hard work and a strong application.
     
    Your best option is probably to seek out a good clinical or counseling psych program that has one or more faculty members who are interested in religion. The names that come most quickly to mind are Bowling Green (Pargament); Pepperdine (Shafranske); Loyola-Baltimore (Piedmont); Connecticut (Park); Fuller (several); Regent (several); Brigham Young (several). Of course, several of those universities are religiously affiliated, so you may or may not feel personally able to agree to study there with the expectations that they have for students. Still, you should at least check in to each of these universities and consider just what type of fit they may provide you. I don't believe that any of those faculty study faith development themselves, but each of them do study the psychology of religion and would likely be open to studying faith development.
     
    In all likelihood, I've left out some others who would be suitable, as this list is merely what comes to mind at the moment, but this will give you a start. I should also mention that I am replying to this question in February, 2008. If you are reading this in a few years, the answer almost certainly will have changed as university faculty retire or are hired, and as university curricula and degree programs change. For instance, the psychology department at my university has initiated a Psy.D., aimed at preparing students to practice clinical psychology in rural settings. There is no formal psychology of religion component, but students can do their dissertation on a variety of topics, including religion. Return to top

I'm doing a study of religion and would like to find a scale to measure it. What scale should I use?

Is my degree -- Ph.D. in psychology of religion, in a department of religion -- going to land me a job in a psychology department?

    In general, psychology departments in the U.S. hire people whose degrees are from psychology departments. Exceptions exist, but they are rare. If your degree is in the psychology of religion, but from a Department of Religious Studies, you are most likely to locate a position in that type of department. Here are some sources where such positions are advertised: Chronicle of Higher Ed, Inside Higher Ed, and The American Academy of Religion.

I don't see my question listed here. What is your email address?

 


Amazon.com Privacy Information Recommendations from Amazon.com



Back to Psychology & Religion Home Page ...or.... Top of this file ...or...
Email me - delete the "_delete_me_" portion: mnielsen_delete_me_@georgiasouthern.edu