Back to Self-Quiz Index
Back to Psych Web Home Page

Self-Quiz on Senses and Perception

Revised 4/4/2004. Welcome to the self-quiz on Senses and Perception. Read the question and click on an answer. You will jump to a correction or (if the answer is correct) a confirmation. No total score is provided for this quiz because it is meant to be browsed; you can scan the responses to wrong answers as well as right answers. If you run into problems or have a question, read the introductory paragraphs on the self-quiz index page.

  1. What is myopia?
  2. Green afterimages after staring at red objects is evidence for..
  3. Evidence from brain scans shows...
  4. What do the ossicles accomplish?
  5. The frequency theory of auditory encoding suggests that different frequencies of sound...
  6. The little bumps visible on your tongue are...
  7. What sense dominates our ability to taste foods and liquids?
  8. How do scientists know endorphins are involved in placebo pain relief?
  9. What is the vestibular apparatus?
  10. The chapter said which of these might account for some ESP-like experiences?

End of multiple choice questions for Senses and Perception

This page is updated at http://www.psywww.com/selfquiz/ch04mcq.htm

To the Psych Web Home Page
Top of this file
To the Self-Quiz Home Page


ANSWERS AND DISCUSSION SECTION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

stain in eye muscles

No, eye muscles are strained (typically) by focusing on close-up objects. That is not myopia.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

degeneration of the retina

No, although degeneration of the retina does occur in some diseases (with serious consequences, including blindness) this is not the same thing as myopia.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

too much pressure in the vitreous humor

No, that is glaucoma, not myopia

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

a problem focussing the visual image

Yes. Myopia is "near-sightedness." It occurs when the focal plane (the area where the visual image would be focussed) is slightly forward from the back the eye, so (unless the person wears corrective lenses) the visual image is out of focus, especially when the individual tries to see far-away objects.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

a problem seeing things which are either too close or too far away

No, that is presbyopia ("old eyes"), the problem caused by lack of flexibility in the lens, remedied by bifocals.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

color blindness

No, people with normal color perception can see colored afterimages.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

two channels of information

No, an afterimage involves only one channel.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

two types of rod receptor

No, color perception in general involves cones, not rods.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

two colors signaled by the same channel

Yes. The general idea is that, since one channel is used to signal information about two colors, when you fatigue (tire out) the response to one color (such as red) then a normal level of nerve activity in the channel will be perceived as green. Hence, staring at a red spot produces a green afterimage when you look at a blank surface, and vice versa.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

black and white opponent processes

No, color aftereffects involve the color perception channels.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

no sign of either hallucinations or illusions, showing they are imagined

No, brain scans can indeed show evidence of both hallucinations and illusions

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

evidence of illusions, but not hallucinations

No, brain scans can shown evidence of both

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

evidence of hallucinations, but not illusions

No, brain scans can show evidence of both

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

evidence of both illusions and hallucinations

Yes. For example, PET scans can show activity corresponding to hallucinated voices, or activity corresponding to the perception of "illusary contours" (to cite two of many examples).

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

evidence of illusions turning into hallucinations

No, I don't know of any case in which illusions turn into hallucinations.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

collecting sound

No, it is the outer ear which collects sounds. The ossicles are in the middle ear.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

amplifying vibrations

Yes. The chain of tiny bones in the middle ear (the ossicles) amplifies sound energy.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

transducing sound to nerve impulses

No, transduction is the function of the inner ear; the ossicles are in the middle ear.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

equalizing pressure between the middle and outer ear

No, it is the eustachian tube which serves this function, not the ossicles.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

equaling pressure between the middle and inner ear

No, there is no need for pressure to be equalized between middle and inner ear. However, pressure differences betwen the middle and outer ear must be equalized. This is done by opening the eustachian tube, not with the ossicles.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

result in different frequencies of nerve impulses

Yes. Below about 200 Hz, there is a direct translation of auditory frequency into frequency of nerve cell firing.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

result in different frequencies of brain rhythms

No...the frequency of low sounds (below 200 Hz) is translated into numbers of nerve impulses, not speed or frequency of brain waves.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

activate different neurons

No, that is the place theory, which is distinct from the frequency theory.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

create "resonance frequencies" in the middle ear

No. The middle ear amplifies all frequencies a person can hear; it does not resonate or vibrate in response to only some frequencies.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

are frequently perceived as "the same"

No, frequency discrimination helps tell different frequencies apart; it does not make them sound the same.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

taste buds

No, these structures are not the taste buds. Taste buds are buried inside pores on these structures.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

taste cells

No, taste cells are grouped within the taste buds; they are not visible.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

papillae

Yes. Those are the little bumps on the surface of the tongue.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

receptors

No, the taste cells are the receptors, and they are not visible.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

epithelium

No, an epithelium is a sheet of cells, not a bump.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

olfactory

Yes. Even though the olfactory sense is "the sense of smell" and the gustatory sense is called "the sense of taste," the sense of smell actually plays the largest role in determining the taste of the food we eat.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

gustatory

No, one might think so because the gustatory sense involves the taste buds and taste cells, but actually olfaction is the dominant influence on the taste of food.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

cutaneous

No, the cutaneous sense is response for pain, pressure, and touch perception.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

kinesthetic

No, the kinesthetic sense is the sense of body position which uses receptors in joints and tendons.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

equilibratory

No, the equilibratory sense is the sense of balance and motion detection.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

endorphins go up when people take aspirin

No...this sounds reasonable, but aspirin works through a different mechanism.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

endorphins go up when people take any pain reliever, no matter what the chemical composition

No, over-the-counter pain relievers are not opiates and do not raise endorphin levels.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

naloxone, an opiate-blocker, eliminates placebo pain relief

Yes. Naloxone counteracts the effects of opiates, so the fact that naloxone eliminates pain relief when given secretly with a placebo indicates strongly that placebo pain relief is due to endogenous opiates (endorphins).

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

placebo pain relief disappears if people are informed that they took a placebo

No, although this might conceivably happen, it does not show us what causes placebo-based pain relief.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

when people are informed that they are receiving endorphins, they show placebo pain relief

No, they can receive pain relief from any placebo, such as a sugar pill represented as a pain medication.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

the cochlea and surrounding bone

No, it is located near the cochlea but involves different organs.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

part of the kinesthetic sense

No, it is part of the sense of equilibrium.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

the organs for the sense of balance

Yes...the vestibular apparatus includes the semicircular canals and the "sacs" (the saccule and utricle). Altogether they contribute to the equilibratory sense, the sense of balance, equilibrium, and movement.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

a specialized nucleus which connects equilibratory and auditory nerves

No, the vestibular apparatus is not a "nucleus" (collection of neurons). It is a collection of sense organs.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

the same thing as the endolymph

No, the endolymph is the fluid inside the semicircular canals, which are part of the vestibular system.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

fever-induced polydipsia

No, polydipsia is excessive water-drinking, so this is not relevant to ESP.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

synchronicity

No, if synchronicity (an "acausal connecting principle") existed, it would be more like a proof of ESP than a substitute or explanation of it.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

precognitive dreams

No, "genuine" precognitive dreams are probably based on intuition, not ESP. So-called precognitive dreams with very great detail are probably deja vu sensations being mistaken for dreams coming true.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

anniversary phenomena

Yes. Anniversary phenomena are ESP-like experiences based on a seasonal rhythm or some other recurring event. For example, if you formerly saw a friend around New Year's Day, you might think of the friend near that time of the year. The friend might think of you, too, and call you on the telephone. It would seem like an uncanny coincidence.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You picked...

"hot flashes"

No, the term "hot flashes" usually refers to periodic bouts of heat and sweating during menopause. It has nothing to do with ESP.

back to questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Back to Psych Web Home Page ...or.... Top of this file.

Don't see what you need? Psych Web has over 1,000 pages, so it may be elsewhere on the site. Do a site-specific Google search using the box below.

Custom Search

"#top">"#top">"#top">